AUSN

SUMMER 2017

Navy magazine is distributed on Capitol Hill,the Pentagon and naval bases around the world. It provides information that impacts Sailors, their families and the Navy. Navy is published quarterly by the Association of the United States Navy (AUSN).

Issue link: http://digital.ausn.org/i/873128

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Health care rep- resents a significant investment for the military – in 2012, it accounted for 10 percent of the Department of Defense's base budget. Standard medical and dental care for every service member and DoD beneficiary comes from this bud- get, of course, but the DoD also operates impressive research hospitals, rehabilitative facilities, in-the- ater hospitals, and specialized centers to treat the wide variety of injuries fighters sustain in modern warfare. Of the roughly 55,000 service members who were injured in Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn, it is estimated that about 16,000 were injured so severely that they would not have survived in previous conflicts. is is a significant improvement in military medicine and the best possible proof of the effectiveness of new procedures, technologies, and research discov- eries. While there are many ways in which medical advances have improved treatment for our fighters, Navy magazine singled out some of the most signifi- cant and interesting to share with its readers. DAMAGE CONTROL RESUSCITATION e term "damage control" originally referred to a ship's ability to absorb damage in battle, remain seaworthy, and continue the mission. Although more commonly heard today in connection with controlling public relations disasters, in the medical community the terms "damage control surgery" and "damage control resuscitation" refer to quick-re- sponse interventions that reduce the long-term impact of traumatic injury. e surgical version (DCS) is based on con- trolling hemorrhage, inserting sponges, and provid- ing temporary wound closure before reaching a safe place for more advanced surgical care. Damage con- trol resuscitation (DCR) incorporates DCS, but also includes restoring blood volume and maintaining "physiologic stability," i.e., normal body function, to the highest degree possible. In recent years, great progress has been made in DCR, especially in the use of blood products during trauma resuscitation. Navy magazine spoke with Lt. Col. Jennifer Hatzfeld, PhD, RN, and Executive Director of the TriService Nursing Research Program at the Uni- formed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS, pronounced U-SIS) about recent advanc- es. Hatzfeld explained that in decades past, nurses and other medical professionals were trained to give trauma patients at least two liters of intravenous fluid aer their injuries, usually saline, and then add Of the roughly 55,000 service members who were injured in Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn, it is estimated that about 16,000 were injured so severely that they would not have survived in previous conflicts. ZONA T. LE WIS Retired Master Chief James "Will" Wilson and Cali Overcast, an eighth- grade student at Fountain Middle School, show off their prosthetic legs during a Team Navy-Coast Guard surprise visit to thank Over- cast for the quilt she made. 26 Navy | Summer 2017

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