AUSN

WINTER 2018

Navy magazine is distributed on Capitol Hill,the Pentagon and naval bases around the world. It provides information that impacts Sailors, their families and the Navy. Navy is published quarterly by the Association of the United States Navy (AUSN).

Issue link: http://digital.ausn.org/i/943821

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33 Association of the United States Navy COURTESY KIMBERLY A. BRUBECK OFFICER AFFAIRS G eographical priority shis within commands across the globe oen can lead to organi- zational restructuring and changes. As senior leadership focuses on the structure of the organization, we must all think about the effects of the process and outcome on the largest component of any organization — personnel. Too oen, decisions that affect many are made in a closed environment. Personnel know that change is afoot, but lack the confidence in their leadership to believe that their interests are being considered. is leads to fears of job loss, position and, most importantly, security. As leaders, we need to remain cognizant of the impor- tance of effectively communi- cating these changes to those that impacted by our decisions. While we may not provide the external public with all of the details of our organizational changes, it is incumbent upon us to keep our internal audi- ence, those that are directly affected, apprised of what is happening and how it will affect them. Before the ink has dried on your approved reorganization plan, the rumor mill will have been in full swing. You can head off much of it from the beginning by simply developing a holding statement for leadership to respond with when asked. Consider something simple such as, "We are looking into possible options to improve the company for both our customers and personnel, and will pass down information as it becomes available." Your holding statement is just one part of a larger communication plan that you will need to develop to effectively inform your personnel. A few key things to consider when developing a communication plan include: • What/Why - Why is the organization restruc- turing or changing? What is the purpose of the change? • Who - Who does the change affect? Is it one section of the organization or everyone? • Timeline: When is the change going to take effect? What are the milestone events they can check off along the way? • Locations/Transfers: Will anyone need to transfer to another department or alternate work location? • Salaries/Benefits: How is this going to affect their salary? Will benefits, to include retirement and bonuses, be affected? Be prepared to explain the intricacies of the changes to staff for dissemination down the organizational chain. You also might consider holding a town hall meeting to explain what personnel can expect and answer questions. Communication plays an important role in under- standing and acceptance. By developing and implementing a plan on how you will commu- nicate changes within your organization, you will not only save yourself from a barrage of resentment, but ease the transition for your most important resource — your personnel. Kimberly A. Brubeck is a commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve and is AUSN's national vice president for Officer Affairs. The Impact of Change Communication minimizes anxiety, eases transition You can head off rumors from the beginning by simply developing a holding statement for leadership to respond when asked. Your holding statement is just one part of a larger communication plan that you will need to develop to effectively inform your personnel.

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